DataStax Blog

A look back at a great 2012 at DataStax

By Billy Bosworth -  January 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

2012 was an impactful year at DataStax and I wanted to take a few moments to share some of our highlights from both a business and technology perspective.

The number one thing that stands out to me as I look back in review is the humbling feeling I have in working with our customers. They are doing some truly amazing, innovative, and exciting things that will fundamentally transform their companies. From startups to 20 of the Fortune 100, hundreds of companies partnered with DataStax to help reshape their customer experiences. That kind of transformative impact is exactly why I decided to devote my time and passion to this space. It is truly a remarkable time.

To continue serving our customers and community, we decided to take some additional investment that came in the form of our $25M Series C round, led by Meritech Capital Partners, with strong support and participation from our existing venture team of Lightspeed Venture Partners and Crosslink Capital. The funding gives us the runway we need to continue innovating as well as expanding internationally, starting with Europe.

As things took off externally with customers, we also focused on growing our team internally with expansion in every area of the company. We are a distributed team that is headquartered in San Mateo, CA, but also with a key office in Austin, TX, plus dozens of remote individuals in the US and abroad. The San Mateo office hit capacity towards the end of 2012, so in February 2013 we will open another new office located in Sunnyvale, CA, devoted entirely to our engineers.

On the open source side, we hosted our annual Cassandra Summit with wall-to-wall crowds at the Santa Clara Convention Center. With more than 800 attendees and an amazing list of speakers, you could feel this was the year when Cassandra’s popularity exploded. In addition to the Cassandra Summit, we sponsored 82 meetups attended by more than 2,500 people. This is the heart and soul of our community, and we have so much more planned for them in 2013!

From a technology perspective, 2012 was also off the charts in terms of productivity.

Apache Cassandra 1.1 was released containing many new additions in the area of developer functionality and simpler manageability. We also open sourced an early version of a new, advanced Java driver that takes advantage of some new Cassandra 1.2 capabilities (released January 2013). For a more in-depth look at Cassandra in 2012, please see this blog post from our co-founder and the Apache Cassandra project chairman, Jonathan Ellis.

Our flagship product, DataStax Enterprise (the big data platform built on a certified version of Apache Cassandra), had a number of important releases throughout the year. The most notable of the releases was version 2.0 that delivered the integration of enterprise search. We also enhanced DataStax Enterprise to include much more powerful Hadoop management capabilities where multi datacenter support is concerned. Note that what we did goes beyond simple failover or hot-standby functionality; instead, it provides true multi-directional, location independent Hadoop operations exactly like our Cassandra users enjoy today.

To make all this integration even easier, we added new functionality in our OpsCenter management solution so that customers can intuitively manage many database clusters at once through our graphical browser-based interface, protect their clusters with easily managed backups, and monitor all their Cassandra, Hadoop, and Solr operations from a single pane of glass.

Finally, it was gratifying to witness independent verification of Cassandra’s position as the NoSQL leader in scale and performance. An academic benchmark paper published by the University of Toronto in August 2012, and presented at a VLDB conference, summarized their findings that compared numerous NoSQL and RDBMS databases as follows: “In terms of scalability, there is a clear winner throughout our experiments. Cassandra achieves the highest throughput for the maximum number of nodes in all experiments with linearly increasing throughput.”

2012 was made great by a tremendously dedicated and talented group of folks who I am truly privileged to work with. Thanks to everyone here at DataStax who made it such a memorable year, and I can’t wait to see what we will accomplish together in 2013!



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